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cover of Handbook of environmental fluid dynamics /edited by Harindra Joseph Fernando.
Other: Fernando, Harindra Joseph.
Call Number: QC809.F5H33 2013
ISBN(s): 9781439816691
1439816697
Notes:
cover of Fundamentals of ecosystem science /Kathleen C. Weathers, David L. Strayer, and Gene E. Likens.
Author: Weathers, Kathie.
Other: Strayer, David Lowell,1955-Likens, Gene E.,1935-
Call Number: QH541.W33 2013
ISBN(s): 9780120887743
0120887746
Notes:
cover of The biology and ecology of tintinnid ciliates :models for marine plankton /edited by John R. Dolan ... [et al.].
Other: Dolan, John R.(John Richard),1955-
Call Number: QL368.T55B56 2013
ISBN(s): 9780470671511 (cloth)
0470671513 (cloth)
Notes:
cover of The dodo and the solitaire :a natural history /Jolyon C. Parish.
Author: Parish, Jolyon C.,
Call Number: QL696.C67P37 2013
ISBN(s): 9780253000996 (cloth : alk. paper)
0253000998 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780253001030 (e-book)
025300103X (e-book)
Notes:
cover of Sand Dune Conservation, Management and Restoration.
Call Number: QH541.5.S26
ISBN(s): 9789400747302
9400747306
Notes:

 


 

cover of Gametogenesis, Early Embryo Development and Stem Cell Derivation.
Call Number: QL964
ISBN(s): 9781461455318
1461455316
Notes:
cover of Climate Change Impacts on Plant Biomass Growth.
Call Number: SB112.5
ISBN(s): 9789400753693
9400753691
Notes:
cover of Allergenic pollen :a review of the production, release, distribution and health impacts /Mikhail Sofiev, Karl-Christian Bergmann, editors.
Other: Sofiev, Mikhail.Bergmann, Karl-Christian.
Call Number: QK658.A45 2013
ISBN(s): 9789400748804
9400748809
Notes:
cover of Principles of statistical genomics /Shizhong Xu.
Author: Xu, Shizhong.
Call Number: QH438.4.S73X8 2013
ISBN(s): 9780387708065
0387708065
Notes:
cover of Cave MicrobiomesA Novel Resource for Drug Discovery.
Call Number: QR46.5
ISBN(s): 9781461452058
1461452058
Notes:

cover of Graphene :fundamentals and emergent applications /Jamie H. Warner, Franziska Sch{232}affel, Alicja Bachmatiuk, Mark H. R{232}ummeli.
Author: Warner, Jamie H.
Other: Schaffel, Fransizka.Rummeli, Mark.Bachmatiuk, Alicja.
Call Number: QD341.H9W284 2013
ISBN(s): 9780123945938
0123945933
Notes:
cover of Diffusion and mass transfer /James S. Vrentas and Christine M. Vrentas.
Author: Vrentas, James S.
Other: Vrentas, Christine Mary Jarzebski,1953-
Call Number: QD543.V735 2013
ISBN(s): 9781466515680 (hardcover : alk. paper)
1466515686 (hardcover : alk. paper)
Notes:
cover of The Chemical History of Color.
ISBN(s): 9783642326417
3642326412
Notes:
cover of Quantum-chemical Studies on Porphyrins, Fullerenes and Carbon Nanostructures.
Call Number: QD462
ISBN(s): 9783642318443
3642318444
Notes:

cover of High energy astrophysics :an introduction /by Thierry Courvoisier.
Author: Courvoisier, T.,
Call Number: QB
ISBN(s): 9783642309694 (hbk.)
3642309690 (hbk.)
Notes:
cover of Foundations of space and time :reflections on quantum gravity /[edited by] Jeff Murugan, Amanda Weltman&George F.R. Ellis.
Other: Murugan, Jeff.Weltman, Amanda.Ellis, George F. R.(George Francis Rayner)
Call Number: QC173.59.S65F68 2011
ISBN(s): 9780521114400 (hardback)
0521114403 (hardback)
Notes:
cover of Condensed-phase molecular spectroscopy and photophysics /Anne Myers Kelley.
Author: Kelley, Anne Myers,
Call Number: QC173.458.S64K47 2013
ISBN(s): 9780470946701 (cloth)
0470946709 (cloth)
Notes:
cover of Statistical thermodynamics :understanding the properties of macroscopic systems /Lukong Cornelius Fai, Gary Matthew Wysin.
Author: Fai, Lukong Cornelius.
Other: Wysin, Gary Matthew.
Call Number: QC311.5.F35 2013
ISBN(s): 9781466510678 (Hardback : acid-free paper)
1466510676 (Hardback : acid-free paper)
Notes:
cover of A practical guide to optical metrology for thin films /by Michael Quinten.
Author: Quinten, Michael.
ISBN(s): 9783527411672 (pbk.)
3527411674 (pbk.)
Notes:

My colleague, Uta Grothkopf, ESO Library just shared this blog and I thought I would continue the sharing...what do you all think?   Is this the direction you see?

Jisc (originally: Joint Information Systems Committee) is an organization in the UK that offers leadership and support to UK educational organizations (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus.aspx). Sarah Porter, head of innovation at Jisc, and Torsten Reimer published an blog post entitled

"Top seven predictions for the future of research"
(http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform35/7Predictions.html)

According to the authors, these are:

1. Research will go mobile
Tablet computers and mobile phones are sophisticated enough to collect data during field work and sometimes even to process it, allowing researchers to share findings instantaneously with distributed teams across the globe

2. Lines between professionals, amateurs and the public will blur Researchers and citizen scientists collaborate through "crowd sourcing" (example: Galaxy Zoo)

3. Researchers fully embrace social media Scientists increasingly use social media to share and discover information. Social media will enhance the visibility and reputation of researchers (example: "altmetrics", alternative metrics to journal impact factors based on discussions and mentioning in social media)

4. Data will drive research across many disciplines Data-driven research will become more prominent in many disciplines including for instance the humanities

5. Automate it
Automated parts of the research process can help cope with the ever increasing amount of information, e.g., text mining to identify relevant research publications.

6. Visualize it
Use of visualization and info-graphics will increase

7. Researchers as data managers
With data at the heart of their activities, researchers will have to be more involved in its management and curation

cheers,

…Uta

Uta Grothkopf
ESO Library


My colleague, Uta Grothkopf, ESO Library just shared this blog and I thought I would continue the sharing...what do you all think?   Is this the direction you see?

Jisc (originally: Joint Information Systems Committee) is an organization in the UK that offers leadership and support to UK educational organizations (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus.aspx). Sarah Porter, head of innovation at Jisc, and Torsten Reimer published an blog post entitled

"Top seven predictions for the future of research"
(http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform35/7Predictions.html)

According to the authors, these are:

1. Research will go mobile
Tablet computers and mobile phones are sophisticated enough to collect data during field work and sometimes even to process it, allowing researchers to share findings instantaneously with distributed teams across the globe

2. Lines between professionals, amateurs and the public will blur Researchers and citizen scientists collaborate through "crowd sourcing" (example: Galaxy Zoo)

3. Researchers fully embrace social media Scientists increasingly use social media to share and discover information. Social media will enhance the visibility and reputation of researchers (example: "altmetrics", alternative metrics to journal impact factors based on discussions and mentioning in social media)

4. Data will drive research across many disciplines Data-driven research will become more prominent in many disciplines including for instance the humanities

5. Automate it
Automated parts of the research process can help cope with the ever increasing amount of information, e.g., text mining to identify relevant research publications.

6. Visualize it
Use of visualization and info-graphics will increase

7. Researchers as data managers
With data at the heart of their activities, researchers will have to be more involved in its management and curation

cheers,

…Uta

Uta Grothkopf
ESO Library


My colleague, Uta Grothkopf, ESO Library just shared this blog and I thought I would continue the sharing...what do you all think?   Is this the direction you see?

Jisc (originally: Joint Information Systems Committee) is an organization in the UK that offers leadership and support to UK educational organizations (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus.aspx). Sarah Porter, head of innovation at Jisc, and Torsten Reimer published an blog post entitled

"Top seven predictions for the future of research"
(http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform35/7Predictions.html)

According to the authors, these are:

1. Research will go mobile
Tablet computers and mobile phones are sophisticated enough to collect data during field work and sometimes even to process it, allowing researchers to share findings instantaneously with distributed teams across the globe

2. Lines between professionals, amateurs and the public will blur Researchers and citizen scientists collaborate through "crowd sourcing" (example: Galaxy Zoo)

3. Researchers fully embrace social media Scientists increasingly use social media to share and discover information. Social media will enhance the visibility and reputation of researchers (example: "altmetrics", alternative metrics to journal impact factors based on discussions and mentioning in social media)

4. Data will drive research across many disciplines Data-driven research will become more prominent in many disciplines including for instance the humanities

5. Automate it
Automated parts of the research process can help cope with the ever increasing amount of information, e.g., text mining to identify relevant research publications.

6. Visualize it
Use of visualization and info-graphics will increase

7. Researchers as data managers
With data at the heart of their activities, researchers will have to be more involved in its management and curation

cheers,

…Uta

Uta Grothkopf
ESO Library


My colleague, Uta Grothkopf, ESO Library just shared this blog and I thought I would continue the sharing...what do you all think?   Is this the direction you see?

Jisc (originally: Joint Information Systems Committee) is an organization in the UK that offers leadership and support to UK educational organizations (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus.aspx). Sarah Porter, head of innovation at Jisc, and Torsten Reimer published an blog post entitled

"Top seven predictions for the future of research"
(http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform35/7Predictions.html)

According to the authors, these are:

1. Research will go mobile
Tablet computers and mobile phones are sophisticated enough to collect data during field work and sometimes even to process it, allowing researchers to share findings instantaneously with distributed teams across the globe

2. Lines between professionals, amateurs and the public will blur Researchers and citizen scientists collaborate through "crowd sourcing" (example: Galaxy Zoo)

3. Researchers fully embrace social media Scientists increasingly use social media to share and discover information. Social media will enhance the visibility and reputation of researchers (example: "altmetrics", alternative metrics to journal impact factors based on discussions and mentioning in social media)

4. Data will drive research across many disciplines Data-driven research will become more prominent in many disciplines including for instance the humanities

5. Automate it
Automated parts of the research process can help cope with the ever increasing amount of information, e.g., text mining to identify relevant research publications.

6. Visualize it
Use of visualization and info-graphics will increase

7. Researchers as data managers
With data at the heart of their activities, researchers will have to be more involved in its management and curation

cheers,

…Uta

Uta Grothkopf
ESO Library

 


The American Institute of Physics (AIP) and IOP Publishing (IOP) have jointly announced the gift of a new astronomy thesaurus called the Unified Astronomy Thesaurus (UAT) to the American Astronomical Society (AAS) that will help improve future information discovery for researchers.

The AAS will make the UAT freely available for development and use within the astronomy community, while ensuring the thesaurus remains relevant and useful.

Further development of the UAT will be undertaken by the John G.Wolbach Library at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in collaboration with the Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) to enhance and extend the thesaurus to ensure that it continues to meet the needs of the astronomy community.

Adoption of the thesaurus within the ADS will result in better linking with the majority of astronomy research journal articles through a common vocabulary, thereby greatly improving the accuracy of information discovery.

The work to combine the thesauri has been carried out by Access Innovations, Inc., a privately held company that specializes in information management and database creation products and services.

For details on this endeavor, please view the press release.

http://ioppublishing.org/newsDetails/new-thesaurus-created-for-the-astronomy-community


Once in awhile I run into an article that I find fascinating.  I was just alerted to this article from Annual Review of Entomology, 2012, vol. 57, 205-227, Insects as Weapons of War, Terror, and Torture by Jeffrey A. Lockwood, Department of Philosophy and MFA Program in Creative Writing, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071

If you have a few moments, I recommend this excellent review.  Here is a snippet from the abstract:

For thousands of years insects have been incorporated into human conflict, with the goals of inflicting pain, destroying food, and transmitting pathogens.

There is also a related video.  For all you folks who love or hate six-legged creatures....

http://www.library.drexel.edu/cgi-bin/r.cgi?url=http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-ento-120710-100618


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