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Provide the Health Sciences and Public Health community at Drexel with up to the minute information about programs, events, and library resources.

Health Sciences Libraries: Hours for weekend of June 11-12

Due to staffing limitations, the Hahnemann Library will be open 10 am to 5 pm on Saturday, June 11 and Sunday, June 12.  Queen Lane Library, which began Summer hours at the beginning of June, is closed on weekends.

The 24-hour study space at Hahnemann Library will be open as always, with access to computers, printer and photocopiers.

 

It's Crunch Time! Where do you like to study?

Exam time is here and students are staking out their favorite study spots! At the Hahnemann Library, remember that you can reserve a group study room online -- up to 3 hours at a time for groups of 3 or more.

Congratulations!

To all our students who are getting ready to graduate!

If you're finishing up your thesis or dissertations, look  at http://www.library.drexel.edu/services/ccthesisbinding for information about bringing copies of your thesis to the library for binding.

Memorial Day Weekend: Queen Lane and Hahnemann Library Hours

It's the start of summer, the end of classes! To help you plan your study time around your holiday cookouts, here's the Health Sciences Libraries' hours for the weekend:

Queen Lane Library: close at 5:00 pm on Friday, May 27th. Closed Saturday, Sunday and Monday.

Hahnemann Library: Regular hours Friday, Saturday and Sunday (see calendar); open Monday 10:00 am to 11:00 pm.

RefWorks -- PubMed -- CINAHL: Workshops at the Hahnemann Library!

Do you want to brush up on your searching skills, or learn how to use RefWorks to organize your research (and magically format all those citations in APA style)?

DIY! Reserve a Hahnemann Library Group Study Room Online!

We're very excited to announce that our self-serve Group Study Room Reservation system is now online and available for use! If our blog could make trumpet noises, you would be hearing a loud fanfare right now!

You'll find the link to the Reservation system on our homepage, right under the Hahnemann hours. Sign in with your usual credentials (Drexel email ID and password). You can see what's booked and what's available every day for the next week; you can then reserve the room of your choice for up to 3 hours at a time.

EZ Borrow Temporarily Unavailable

The EZ Borrow system for borrowing books from other (non-Drexel) libraries is transitioning to a new system, Relais. Because we don't think that Relais is quite "ready for prime time", we're delaying our adoption of this system while we do further testing.

In the meantime, all book borrowing will be done through our ILLiad system.  Login to ILLiad using your university ID and password in the My Accounts box on the homepage, and place your request -- you'll receive an email message from ILLiad when the book you request is waiting for you at the Library.

NY Times Consumer Health Recommendations: Hahnemann Librarian Responds

In the February 6th NY Times Sunday Magazine, Virginia Heffernan wrote about the hazards on online medical advice sites, comparing WebMD and May Clinic Health Information.  This week's Magazine section published a letter from Hahnemann Libraries' Linda Katz, recommending the National Library of Medicine's Medline

New Book, Drexel Authors!

Congratulations to H. Michael Dreher and Mary Ellen Smith Glasgow of the College of Nursing and Health Professions for their role as editors of the recently published book, Role Development for Doctoral Advanced Nursing Practice; and to Hahnemann librarian Gary Childs, co-author with Fran Cornelius and Linda Wilson of CNHP of the chapter, Leveraging Technology to Support Doctoral Advanced Nursing Practice.

New Book Highlights

Some recent additions to the Hahnemann collections:

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks / Rebecca Skloot (Crown Publishers, 2010).  From the author's website:

"Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine.

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